American Renaissance

Black Drivers Ticketed More

AR Articles on Racial Profiling
De-Policing Seattle (Aug. 2001)
Rudy Gets it Right (Nov. 2000)
Police Chief Fights Back (Nov. 1999)
Race, Crime, and Violence in America (Jul. 1999)
Search AmRen.com for Racial Profiling
More news stories on Racial Profiling
AP, Feb. 28

WILMINGTON, Del. — Black drivers in Delaware pay higher speeding fines than white motorists, a newspaper investigation has found.

{snip}

Some black drivers, however, believe their skin color influenced the police officer. One is Andre Brown of New York, who said he was driving with the traffic flow when a Greenwood officer ticketed him for going 64 mph in a 35-mph zone in 2002.

“I wasn’t the only one speeding that day,” said Mr. Brown, who was headed to Virginia when he got the $142 ticket.

A newspaper analysis of 877,200 computerized speeding ticket records from 1994 through 2003 showed:

•The average ticket cost black drivers 7 percent more money than white drivers because police charge them with exceeding the posted limit by greater speeds than white drivers.

•Statewide, police charged 29 percent of black speeders with driving more than 15 mph over the limit, compared with 23 percent of white drivers. At speeds above 15 mph over the limit, the ticket cost increases by $20.

•Black drivers statewide received 19 percent of tickets, equal to Delaware’s black population. But in Harrington and Greenwood, the state’s top two ticket-writing towns, the percentage of blacks ticketed was much higher. Four state police troops, the Delaware River & Bay Authority and other towns had disparities.

{snip}

Original article

(Posted on February 28, 2005)

     Previous story       Next Story       Post a Comment      Search

Comments


Home      Top      Previous story       Next Story      Search

Post a Comment

Commenting guidelines: We welcome comments that add information or perspective, and we encourage polite debate. Statements of fact and well-considered opinion are welcome, but we will not post comments that include obscenities or insults, whether of groups or individuals. We reserve the right to hold our critics to lower standards.




Remember Me?

(you may use HTML tags for style)