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Internet Scammers Keep Working in Nigeria

AR Articles on Africa
The Agony of Africa (Dec. 2003)
Why is Africa Poor? (Jan. 1992)
Light on the Dark Continent (Oct. 1992)
More news stories on Africa
Dulue Mbachu, AP, Aug. 8

LAGOS, Nigeria — In Festac Town, an entire community of scammers overnights on the Internet. By day they flaunt their smart clothes and cars and hang around the Internet cafes, trading stories about successful cons and near misses, and hatching new plots.

Festac Town is where communication specialists operating underground sell foreign telephone lines over which a scammer can purport to be calling from any city in the world. Here lurk master forgers and purveyors of such software as “e-mail extractors,” which can harvest e-mail addresses by the million. Now, however, a 3-year-old crackdown is yielding results, Nigerian authorities say.

Nuhu Ribadu, head of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, says cash and assets worth more than $700 million were recovered from suspects between May 2003 and June 2004. More than 500 suspects have been arrested, more than 100 cases are before the courts and 500 others are under investigation, he said.

The agency won its first big court victory in May when Mike Amadi was sentenced to 16 years in prison for setting up a Web site that offered juicy but phoney procurement contracts. Amadi cheekily posed as Ribadu himself and used the agency’s name. He was caught by an undercover agent posing as an Italian businessman.

This month the biggest international scam of all — though not one involving the Internet — ended in court convictions. Amaka Anajemba was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in prison and ordered to return $25.5 million of the $242 million she helped to steal from a Brazilian bank.

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Original article

(Posted on August 8, 2005)

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