American Renaissance

Airport Drops Plan To Mark Liquor-Free Cabs

AR Articles on Islam in America
Will America Learn the Lessons of Sept. 11? (Nov. 2001)
The Rise of Islam in America (Nov. 1993)
Feds Raid Nuwaub Nation (Jul. 2002)
Search AmRen.com for Islam in America
More news stories on Islam in America
Tad Vezner, Pioneer Press, October 11, 2006

Two weeks ago, Twin Cities airport officials were firming up plans to allow many Muslim taxi drivers — staunchly opposed to transporting passengers carrying alcohol of any sort — to alert potential fares of their beliefs with a different-colored light atop their cabs.

After a barrage of negative feedback, they’ve decided to scrap the idea.

“Since then, we’ve heard from Australia and England. It’s really touched a nerve among a lot of people. The backlash, frankly, has been overwhelming,” said Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport spokesman Patrick Hogan. “People are overwhelmingly against any kind of cultural accommodation.”

About 80 percent of the airport’s taxis are driven by Somalis, who are commonly Muslim, Hogan said. The Quran, Islam’s holy book, strictly forbids carrying alcohol. The result: Such drivers refuse to carry passengers and are sent to the back of the cab line — typically a three-hour wait.

The plan, which proposed a $40 light that drivers could buy and a two-tiered pickup system, went so far as to be placed on paper. But nobody signed the papers, and the program never went into effect, Hogan said.

{snip}

Interviews with about a dozen cabbies at the airport Tuesday night indicated that Muslim drivers intend to continue to stand by their religious beliefs and not transport passengers carrying alcohol.

“It’s going to be tough, it’s going to be really tough, I don’t know what’s going to be next,” said Ali Abdi of St. Paul. “We have the right (to refuse to transport alcohol). We are still human being(s).”

A couple went so far as to say they view the backlash as unfairly targeting Somalis and Muslims.

Non-Muslim drivers said they didn’t have opinions on the matter.

{snip}

Original article

(Posted on October 12, 2006)

     Previous story       Next Story       Post a Comment      Search

Comments


Home      Top      Previous story       Next Story      Search

Post a Comment

Commenting guidelines: We welcome comments that add information or perspective, and we encourage polite debate. Statements of fact and well-considered opinion are welcome, but we will not post comments that include obscenities or insults, whether of groups or individuals. We reserve the right to hold our critics to lower standards.




Remember Me?

(you may use HTML tags for style)