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Diversity May Be Fashion Week’s Latest Victim

AR Articles on Multiculturalism and Diversity
Multicultural Hell Comes to America (Jan. 2002)
Let’s Hate America (Jan. 2001)
The Rainbow Menace (Apr. 1998)
The Religion of Anti-Racism (Apr. 1999)
The Myth of Diversity (Jul. 1997)
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More news stories on Multiculturalism and Diversity
Anne Bratskeir, Newsday, January 30, 2008

‘There should be more than one spot for a black model,” says Yordanos Teshager, 21, a reed-thin, nearly 6-foot-tall model from Ethiopia who is represented by the prestigious Elite agency. But despite going on 85 cast calls seeking work during Fashion Week last season, she says she often left feeling that “they were going to hire a white girl.”

They did. Teshager walked in only 11 of some 200 shows last September, a season in which, overall, women of color were glaringly absent. Of the 101 shows and presentations posted on Style.com, more than a third employed no black models, according to an article in Women’s Wear Daily.

Models were a homogeneous bunch — overwhelmingly white, bony and often blond. Along with the obvious — and serious — issue of racism, some wondered whether it wasn’t all becoming just a little boring. Which is why, when Fashion Week opens tomorrow at Bryant Park, observers won’t just be looking at the clothes — they’ll also be looking for a serious change in who’s wearing them.

{snip}

“Some shows had just one black model,” Barker [Nigel Barker, the photographer and judge on TV’s “America’s Next Top Model”] says, adding that he found the shows monotonous, visually unexciting and depressing. “Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

{snip}

Efforts from the inside

If there is a change, it will be in no small part because of the efforts of former model and agent Bethann Hardison, who has organized three panel discussions since September on the lack of diversity on runways. And it’s a problem that’s been building, she says. “It’s not just a bad year, it’s been a bad decade.”

{snip}

Though she particularly advocates for African-Americans, Hardison says the problem affects all races and she vehemently objects to the apparent new taboo of looking different. “Forget even a white girl with style and personality. .&Nbsp;. . Fashion is going backwards.” Bottom line, Hardison says, “The fashion designer no longer relates to the model, and I believe this is where I can raise consciousness and generate a sense of responsibility. It’s race-based, and race conscious and that makes it unconsciously racist.”

John Mincarelli, a longtime professor of fashion merchandising at the Fashion Institue of Technology in Manhattan, who takes a sociological view of fashion, agrees. “There’s a complete lack of personality and that has to come from the designer. It’s a dictate. Black models always bring personality to the runway.”

{snip}

Blaming the agencies

But casting agent Jennifer Starr, who is also a judge on Bravo’s “Make Me a Supermodel” and is casting for Ralph Lauren, J Mendel, Alice Temperley and Carlos Miele, believes the problem stems from the modeling agencies.

“It’s not the designers’ fault . . . at least the designers I work for,” she says. “Ralph Lauren, especially, is constantly asking me why there aren’t more African-American models he can put in his show.” Starr says the agencies don’t seek out African-American women of the same level as the white women they take on. She says she would hope that designers would want diversity, but, she adds, “I don’t feel anyone should compromise their aesthetic just to be more representational. They should use the girls they love, whether that girl is white, black, Hispanic or Asian.”

{snip}

Not surprisingly, modeling agencies don’t want to take the blame for the dearth of diversity. Roman Young, the director of new faces at Elite, says, “We are doing our part. This is a blended office ethnically and culturally. I’m really passionate about the beauty spectrum.” Young says that when a client asks for “the girl next door,” he responds that “the girl next door to me was Filipino. . . . Can I send a black girl?” Although he says he’s fully aware that the client wants a white model, he notes that in the end, “It’s my job to sell beauty not ethnicity.”

Getting behind change

Calling for an end to all the finger pointing, Ivan Bart, senior vice president of powerhouse agency IMG models who represents black supermodels like Alek Wek, Liya Kebede and Naomi Campbell, says this should be “about the industry coming together and recognizing what the consumer wants. There’s a diverse group of consumers out in America and we should be listening to them.”

{snip}

Ford Models president John Caplan adds, “Our role, and the role of the agent, is to scout for interesting faces of all ethnicities. . . . The responsibility for who is successful comes down to what the marketplace wants.” Well in advance of Fashion Week, Ford’s superstar Chanel Iman Robinson, who was often the single black face in shows last season, was already reserved for most of the major shows.

{snip}

fashion

What’s wrong with this picture? Not very much.

Original article

(Posted on February 1, 2008)

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Comments

Even when they trot out a black, it will be one that is virtually all white in terms of racial admixture.

How often do you see a pure blooded black in a beauty pageant?…even one exclusively for black contestants?

I recall seeing Tyra Banks complain about black women being under represented being her motivation for pursuing a modeling career.

Why do so many black men go after white women - not to mention Asian and Hispanic women?

On a scale of 1 to 100, how “black” is Tyra Banks…maybe a 20 to 25?

Posted by RJS at 5:54 PM on February 1


If the client wants a White model and the agency is pushing a black one on him, he can just take his business elsewhere. You think maybe those black models make the clothes look bad?

Posted by at 6:00 PM on February 1


I’m a white Christian male and I have no interest in looking at non-whites models. I do wish all non-white models the best of luck and success in their native countries however. Anyone who doesn’t like my opinion can go and jump off the nearest bridge.

Posted by Tim at 6:02 PM on February 1


Yes, let’s blame Whitey because most people seem to identify beauty with “paleness”.

Posted by Obscuratus at 6:41 PM on February 1


This is in contrast to what we see on TV advertising daily. My new favorite for the ad with the magic black guy is the new Plavix ad. It shows this tall, super competent black guy directing a bunch of poor white workers during a power outage. After showing him in a variety of commanding positions, it shows him standing in darkness and then the lights to the city coming on. The ultimate magic black guy. Get this advertising agency to handle the model hiring, and the beautiful models will be all black, with only a few short, fat white women with bad complexions as competition.

Posted by William Hendershot at 6:44 PM on February 1


Seems that white people can’t appear anywhere without a black escort. Can’t this woman get a job with the Ethiopian fashion industry? Ethiopians aren’t attractive, nor are Africans. African Americans can be, if that’s your thing, but that’s because most of them are half white.

“Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

And who’s fantasising about being a different colour?

Fortunately the market will decide what it wants to look at.

Posted by at 6:58 PM on February 1


“John Mincarelli, a longtime professor of fashion merchandising at the Fashion Institue of Technology in Manhattan, who takes a sociological view of fashion, agrees. “There’s a complete lack of personality and that has to come from the designer. It’s a dictate. Black models always bring personality to the runway.”“

Yeah, right. Models don’t speak. They walk around in clothes and pose for pictures. All these contorted arguments to draw attention away from the universally acknowledged fact that white women are the most beautiful and black women are the least. I always laugh at articles like this because all I see are ugly diversity models everywhere I look.

Posted by Civilized Neighbor at 7:01 PM on February 1


Aww are the others getting a tiny bit jealous of the white woman’s beauty? can’t quite live up to a lady who can have several different hair and eye color’s can you? Maybe you should return from whence you came where your physical traits are adored, rather than go to a country of this very same woman and get yourself into a fury when shes preferred over you.

Posted by Stuck in No Mans Land at 8:22 PM on February 1


Get over it. I am not fashion model material either, fashion if fickle and not many black/hispanic/asian women fit what high fashion wants to use as a model. There are not that many European women out there fit the profile either. They could get jobs as print models, television commercials and other advertising, they do not have to depend on runway modeling.

Posted by Spartan24 at 8:33 PM on February 1


Modeling agencies choose what the clients want and what sells. Bottom line. It’s not about racism, it’s about supply and demand.

Posted by at 8:38 PM on February 1


“There’s a diverse group of consumers out in America and we should be listening to them.”

And, surprise, they generally find White women more attractive, whether they admit it or not.

Posted by Guillaume at 8:38 PM on February 1


I have suggested it many times over the decades. We can put the race nonsense to rest with strict proportions. Twelve percent of the US population is black. OK! Make sure they get 1 out of 8 of every damn thing…..1 out of 8 jobs, houses, cars, and money. ONE part of every EIGHT of every thing. If there are not enough blacks to go around, go where they are plentiful and recruit. If there are too many, too bad. One out of eight is all you get.

Just make sure they agree IN ADVANCE to a strict rule on everything: One of every eight songs on the radio can include a black artist. One out of every eight football, basketball, and hockey players. (Basketball teams would have to take turns regarding which team could have a black player on the court.) One out of every eight welfare dollars. One out of every eight Cadillacs and Lincolns. One out of every eight members of Congress.

Don’t laugh too loud. I have already seen this in action. Cities and corporations accused of discrimination in the past have been under consent decrees requiring strict proportional rules for hiring by race and gender. Every position in the organization labeled male/female and black/white. This is no joke. I have been in such organizations myself.

Posted by Memphomaniac at 8:40 PM on February 1


I surprised this is even an issue anymore. In the age we live in there are no more standards anymore. Everyone is smart, capable and no less attractive than anyone else. It reminds me of a Covergirl commercial I saw a month ago. I always manage to crack a smile (or smirk) whenever I see it. In the first one, there’s this obese black woman talking about the makeup. They show these beautiful White models while she does the dialog. They flash their images and finally in the last shot they insert this black woman into the last image you see. They really over did her makeup and she’s painted up like a clown. That’s one subliminal message that won’t get to me.

Posted by at 8:41 PM on February 1


I have more than a passing interest in fashion, and I like a lot of Ralph Lauren. But if I start seeing his stuff being favored by the gals in the hood, I’m not going to buy it anymore than I would buy FUBU.
That image turns me off, but maybe I’m just a shallow kinda gal!

Posted by kitty at 9:02 PM on February 1


It’s race-based, and race conscious and that makes it unconsciously racist.”

Doesn’t this describe 100% of black institutions? Create your own damn show and quit blaming us for your failures.

“There should be more than one spot for a black model,” says Yordanos Teshager, 21, a reed-thin, nearly 6-foot-tall model from Ethiopia.”

When I see the starting lineup for the Knicks I think, “there should be more than zero spots for a non-black player.” This is especially true after seeing all-white European teams run circles around all-black “U.S. Dream Teams.”


Posted by Bernie at 9:03 PM on February 1


I think the dearth of pygmies and aboriginies in the modeling world is an affront to all people of color. When will this age discrimination end also, since nary a great grandmother is ever on the runways. Research has shown that hooters girls overall are better looking than most “supermodels”.

Posted by Lars at 9:04 PM on February 1


Nobody is stopping some black man or woman from starting a black oriented fashion house that puts out its own designs and exhibits them using black models. Such an entrepreneur will clean up by serving that vast untapped market of people who want to gawk at black women in expensive clothes.

Or maybe there just isn’t any such market.

Posted by WR the elder at 9:30 PM on February 1


Tyra Banks’ mother is white. I don’t know how much white admixture her father had, probably at least some.

Posted by Joe at 10:03 PM on February 1


Poor Miss Yardonos. Maybe she could get work in commercials for Ethiopian famine relief.

Let’s look at the American consumer. White women want to look like White women. Hispanic women want to look like White women, or at least European Spanish, not short, dark, football shaped mestizos. Black women want to look like White women, or at least lighter skinned blacks. White men want White women, although a few like a trip to the jungle on occasion. Black men, well, we know the stereotypes, and since they have no money no one cares what they want. Asians of all persuasions are but a small percentage of the American population and have coveted American fashion and wealth for more than a century.

Given all that, can you explain why most models are White?

Posted by Flamethrower at 10:11 PM on February 1


Let the free market decide. If the cosmetics industry think a black model will improve sales they will use one. It should be their unrestricted right to decide for themselves.

Posted by at 10:35 PM on February 1


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. So why are they shoving the concept of black “beauty” down everyone else’s throats?

I would think black women would seem more beautiful to black people. So why must the rest of us be convinved of this? Can’t we see and think on our own?

If blacks don’t like the fashion models then they shouldn’t buy the clothes. That’s why I don’t watch basketball on TV. I’m tired of seeing black millionaires bouncing a ball and being portrayed as heores. It’s ridiculous.

Posted by Lucas M at 11:07 PM on February 1


The newest winner of Ford modeling competition for prizes, layouts, and face of the year is a korean. BTW, Chanel Iman is part Korean as is Kimora Simmons. Many of the ‘successful blacks’ are actually part something else.

Don’t tell me that the fashion industry is biased. They’ll go with what will sell!! If asians sell, they’ll get asians which they are starting to do more and more. Some companies are planning to shoot american commercials in japanese, chinese, korean, etc.. because the asians have the highest income. If people want blacks, the companies will supply blacks but I doubt that will happen very soon. The black faces in media have been pushed by white guilt and black demand not legitimate shifts in economy, social perception, or reality.

Posted by at 1:30 AM on February 2


Joe:

Tyra Bank’s mother is not White. She is Black.

Posted by Francine at 2:56 AM on February 2


These high profile designers who put these models on their runways, are not selling off the rack clothing, but pricy couture, sold to mostly wealthy white clients. Blacks need to start their own businesses, with their own models if it bothers them so much. Alright, they do have FUBU, and I doubt any white models are begging to model for them.

Posted by at 5:37 AM on February 2


Isn’t it ironic that “diversity” has become a code word for “black”? White women are not only the most beautiful in the universe, they are also the most diverse. Their hair may be any colour from pale blonde, through all the variations of red or brown to raven’s-wing black, and it could be straight, wavy or curly. Their eyes could be blue, brown, green, violet, grey, or hazel. Hair, eyes and skin colour make a symphony of colours, with pink highlights that vary according to their emotions. Other races are like a Model T Ford: Hair? - any colour you want, as long as it’s black. Eyes, ditto. If they’re Asian, the hair is straight. If African, tightly curled. You get to choose only from column A.

No, it’s not true that standards of beauty vary between cultures. Fashions may vary, but beauty is universal. If a race exists anywhere in the universe with women more beautiful than ours, they would necessarily be white, too.

I love diversity!

Posted by AnalogMan at 8:06 AM on February 2


Modeling agencies choose what the clients want and what sells. Bottom line. It’s not about racism, it’s about supply and demand.

Posted by at 8:38 PM on February 1

Well, but if your clients want only a black person or white person to serve them, then it is racist. But I see what you’re saying. Employers and business people should be able to make decisions based on what the market wants, not on what the government says.

Posted by at 11:49 AM on February 2


“It shows this tall, super competent black guy directing a bunch of poor white workers during a power outage. After showing him in a variety of commanding positions, it shows him standing in darkness and then the lights to the city coming on.”

That’s highly amusing when an entirely black Western supported government, the ANC, of the wealthiest country in Africa, are presiding over a land where the lights are literally going out.

Posted by at 11:50 AM on February 2


Blacks already have their own groups, banks, clubs, churches, television shows, etc…Why must the incessentaly force their culture on whites and not let us be? To me, the blacks forcing themselves onto whites is akin to forcing someone to date you or marry you who has no interest in you.

Posted by at 11:50 AM on February 2


“Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

I’m afraid it is. I follow haute couture to some degree. I understand that sales of fashion magazines plummet with the diversity parade. If the magazines have a dip in sales, so do the couture houses.

America and Britain have traditionally produced many of the top models. For quite awhile now, the Eastern European models have dominated the industry- the US and UK are insistent on producing a diversity melange with few other choices, and the houses are finished buying that.

Let’s face it- the people who actually buy haute couture throw a little money at Darfur or whatever every once in awhile, and then they’re done with it. They’re wealthy- they get hit with the guilt trip and begging bowl every day. For the rest of us, it’s an art form, and we want to see fantasy.

Starving (anorexic) people from third world countries don’t have much of a place in this. It’s a staged spectacle- nobody really wants to see Christian Children’s Fund infomercials here.

Posted by at 11:59 AM on February 2


Posted by Joe at 10:03 PM on February 1

Tyra Banks’ mother is black although she is sort of light. What is going on here? Whites are claiming blacks as white? Get rid of the brainwashing please - all of it! Most African Americans have very little white, if any. Halle Berry is half white and she ain’t that light!

Posted by at 1:28 PM on February 2


“For quite awhile now, the Eastern European models have dominated the industry- “

Blonde and beautiful. nuff said

Posted by at 6:25 PM on February 2


The only color the fashion industry cares about is the color green, as in a green dollar bill. They’ll hire what sells, white,black or whatever.

Posted by at 6:26 PM on February 2


“represents black supermodels like Alek Wek,”

Alex Wek is no super model. She makes a decent living, that is all. She will have little work once she reaches 30. Her face is rather ugly. Her skin is a true black, not brown which makes it impossible to light her properly and totally unsuitable for group shots with other models. The White models would blend into the paper and Yordanos Teshager and Naomi Campbell would turn yellow.

Also that black black skin means real problems for print work. With so many couture clothes being basic black, that is a problem, it is impossible to tell where her skin ends and the clothes begins. Putting her in white, pastel or bright colors is no solution either. She just doesn’t look right. Brown skinned black models can carry off most colors, but Alex Wek can’t carry off any color.

There is also the problem of Alex Wek’s face.

And according to every magazine marketing expert, consumers will buy a magazine with a blonde on the cover over a magazine with a brunette on the cover every time, even if the magazine has nothing to do with fashion or beauty.

And White models are indeed the most diverse.

Posted by at 6:37 PM on February 2


What was that silly quote about Black models always bringing personality to the runway, or fasion show or whatever…

Stupid. As if Fashion never had it when it was all White.

The 1960’s, for all its failings, was the highwater mark for Fashion, the 70’s didn’t do too bad either in that respect. And it was pretty much all White.

You know what? Even in Fashion, something that is supposed to be fleeting and superfical, you have people who just plain do not want to live in Reality.

THIS is the epidemic of our time. Not Aids, not Cancer, or Heart disease…No, that massive flight from Reality is the virus spreading like wildfire throughout the entire world.

Posted by Dedalus at 7:27 PM on February 2


“Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

Yeah, but most black women’s fantasy is to LOOK white!! What else explains the hair straightener, the blonde wigs (which looks very funny on those ghetto-rapper women), the phony hair made of horse’s mane (yes, they use that), the air brushing in magazine photographs, the lightening/bleaching creams (best-kept secret among blacks except Michael Jackson) and the intense envy that darker skinned female blacks have for “light-skinned sisters” (i.e. mulatto or partially-white black women)?

“Some shows had just one black model,” Barker [Nigel Barker, the photographer and judge on TV’s “America’s Next Top Model”] says.

Gee Nigel, I wonder why? Maybe you should ask some of your black “bruthas” who seem to make a beeline to blonde white women when they come across fame and fortune.

Yes, that IS a nine-hundred pound gorilla standing in the middle of the room. “African-American” women are physically unattractive and more physically unattractive when they have more African blood in them. Of course, a modest, soft-spoken, and humble yet poised personality can ameliorate physical unattractiveness, but once again, most American black women strike out in this category as well. The legions of black women with a chip on the shoulder (or is it a cinder block on the shoulder?), the hand to the face, the swagger, and the “sista” twang in the voice don’t exactly come across as sweet and feminine.

“John Mincarelli, a longtime professor of fashion merchandising at the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan, who takes a sociological view of fashion, agrees. ‘There’s a complete lack of personality and that has to come from the designer. It’s a dictate. Black models always bring personality to the runway.’”

Well thanks for those words of wisdom, Professor Mincarelli. I find it interesting that in your “sociological view” you didn’t say that black models always bring BEAUTY to the runway. Is this evidence of latent racism? Or are you not-so-subtly asserting that white women have no personality? These comments are undoubtedly asinine, no surprise coming from a college professor.

Posted by Don't Spite the White at 8:58 PM on February 2


Why would anybody in business think a black male or female model will help sell anything? Why would anybody want to associate their product or service with blacks? Whenever I see a black model, male or female, in a clothing, car, or other merchandise ad, I immediately discount it, as I don’t want to buy anything that they like, endorse, or sponsor, since people may think me like them in some way. I mean, ‘how many y’alls wants to buy a Cadillac’ when there’s a black face in the driver’s seat?

Posted by MWB at 9:51 PM on February 2


I agree with some of these other posts. Why can’t blacks form THEIR OWN modeling shows? As usual, they always want evil Whitey to get things up and running and THEN enter to cash in- - never having to invest a cent toward the huge amount of money, time ect. it takes to get these shows going!!

Posted by Tom S at 10:11 PM on February 2


“Alex Wek is no super model. She makes a decent living, that is all. She will have little work once she reaches 30. Her face is rather ugly. Her skin is a true black, not brown which makes it impossible to light her properly and totally unsuitable for group shots with other models. The White models would blend into the paper and Yordanos Teshager and Naomi Campbell would turn yellow.

Also that black black skin means real problems for print work. With so many couture clothes being basic black, that is a problem, it is impossible to tell where her skin ends and the clothes begins. Putting her in white, pastel or bright colors is no solution either. She just doesn’t look right. Brown skinned black models can carry off most colors, but Alex Wek can’t carry off any color.”

The photographic problems in dealing with groups of people of mixed skin colors, light and dark, are many indeed, as the commenter mentioned. Much better to have a homogeneous White group and no problems with lighting and exposure. Oh, and the White girls don’t look too bad either, although I still think they are way too thin…

Posted by Laurel at 12:23 AM on February 3


Communism, was basically,.. leveling the playing field,egalitarianism,suposedly designed to removed arbitrary demarcations,that kept groups of underprivilaged people from just acess to upward mobility. If I understand correctly some one hundred million people were sacrificed on this altar of equality.Gentle souls such as Stalin and Mao orchestrated massive campaignes to make everyone equal by killing the natural aristocracy (the most talented people) that nature always produces in small supply. In fact this natural aristocracy is always the true (minority) in numbers. Now political correctness is attempting to make everyone equal genetically,… to remove the (arbitrary)? demarcations between what nature has produced for elegance and what for moving stones around or tanning hides.. So the new commisars have to hit this on two fronts as they did before… they have to convince the public (Re-educate)that what they thought was elegant was illusion spread by evil repressers, secondly is to discourage the beautiful from feeling pride that their ancestors did their genetic homework well and rather feel shame,.. as if their beauty is stolen from the ugly. As I see it Communism was a bad idea economically and is also a bad idea genetic wise. We are told that Cain killed Abel out of jealousy isn’t this also jealousy?? OH and I think the FAIRY TALE was SNOW WHITE… not something brown…should snow white be BANNED?

Posted by Petrarch at 12:37 AM on February 3


These sorts of articles are extremely amusing in their blatant pro-diversity. these are the kinds of mindsets that are so destructive, i am glad that the free market is not controlled by affirmative action like programs.

“Fashion is about fantasy, and every body’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”-barker

actually, nearly everyone’s fantasy is white, otherwise there would be more ethnic models then there are. this guy is ignoring the truths he is in contact with every day.

“…and race conscious and that makes it unconsciously racist.”

Does that even make sense? think about it, it reads like an oxymoron. so quick are liberals to find racism in however a vague instance. So now even if you are not racist, you still run a risk of being “unconsciously” racist. Utter lunacy.

“There’s a complete lack of personality and that has to come from the designer. It’s a dictate. Black models always bring personality to the runway.”

Of course the personality has to come from the designer! its about the clothing, that is why its called fashion!
Whenever anyone says “personality” in describing a woman (especially a model) you KNOW that they mean she is not that attractive. If black women where so great at modelling and so attractive then they would be hired more. the fact is they are not as attractive as white women. Face it, those people who want true beauty embodied in symmetric and refined facial features best look among whites. Blacks just tend to ressemble our evolutionary predeccesors a little too strongly. this is why when people describe black women they use words like “personality” and “nurturing.”

“It’s my job to sell beauty not ethnicity.”

Exactly! by forcing blacks onto the runway you are selling ethnicity, people ask for white women because they are buying actual beauty!

Posted by glorfindel at 1:02 AM on February 3


I notice most models are tall. Looks like discrimination against short people to me!

Posted by at 1:02 AM on February 3


“Despite going on 85 cast calls seeking work during Fashion Week last season, she says she often left feeling that “they were going to hire a white girl.” They did. Teshager walked in only 11 of some 200 shows last September, a season in which, overall, women of color were glaringly absent.”

Why should she be surprised that mostly white models tend to get hired in mostly white countries? Anything unusual about that?
If she doesn’t like that fact, why doesn’t she try working for the high-fashion industry in any one of her own black countries?(And see how well she does!)

Posted by voter at 1:12 AM on February 3


“John Mincarelli, who takes a sociological view of fashion, agrees. “There’s a complete lack of personality and that has to come from the designer. It’s a dictate. Black models always bring personality to the runway.”“

Yeah, right. Models don’t speak. They walk around in clothes and pose for pictures.
— — — — — — — — — — — — —

Yes. Models are just hangers to display the clothes on. They aren’t supposed to speak or take any attention away from the clothes. The clothes are what it’s all about, not the model. So what’s this gibberish about personality?

Posted by at 1:26 AM on February 3


For years now Blacks have been complaining that the beauty industry is too Eurocentric, and has brainwashed most Westerners into believing that Beauty=Whiteness. But then, the beauty industry was started by, and for white people. Therefore, let them start their own fashion and beauty industry, or else quit complaining, that whites are too blind to recognize the beauty of blackness.

Posted by at 4:15 AM on February 3


The real issue here is economics and marteting. If black girls aren’t buying the clothes these models are wearing, why on earth would anyone in the fashion industry want black girls modeling them.

Black women do wear clothes and it would be perfectly appropriate if black women modeled that particular type of clothing. You can often see them in black publications such as Ebony or Jet magaizine. Unfortunately for them, that type of clothing is probably not the expensive dresses that you see the white models wear, so there won’t be as much money in it. There are also fewer black publications compared to the whole, so the black model’s ad will simply not be seen as much.

What is really being asked here is another sort of affirmative action. Some want the fashion industry to pay a lot of money to a black woman who will do nothing for their bottom line.

Posted by John at 9:05 AM on February 3


he found the shows monotonous, visually unexciting and depressing. “Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

Fashion is about money, not political correctness. And White models might not be what Blacks wish to see, but even in countries like Japan and India, White models are seen as a fantasy and are frequently used in advertisements. Black models are rarely if ever, featured in ads for beauty products. They can blame it on racism, or cultural brainwashing, but you can’t force people to see beauty, in that which does not appeal to them.

Posted by at 10:10 AM on February 3


Tyra Banks’ mother is black although she is sort of light. What is going on here? Whites are claiming blacks as white? Get rid of the brainwashing please - all of it! Most African Americans have very little white, if any. Halle Berry is half white and she ain’t that light!

*No, whites aren’t claiming blacks as white. But because she is lighter than Halle Berry, who actually is biracial, it’s easy to see why some people would assume Tyra had a white parent. I did see her Mother once, so I know that she is a light skinned black woman, they also showed pictures of Tyra taken with her Mom when she was a teenager, and she had a much stronger ethnic look about her then. This was before the plastic surgery to thin out her nose, and before she got in the habit of wearing long flowing wigs, with caucasian type hair. Before that, she simply looked like another light skinned black girl, who happened to have light colored eyes.

Posted by at 11:24 AM on February 3


Not long ago, I was leafing through a book on photography. In it, I saw a picture of Grace Kelly taken from her modeling days. I also thought how politically incorrect it would seem today. There she was, with a cigarette holder, being grasped by a long gloved hand, with a mink around her shoulders. Not only would her cigarette, and mink, be deemed offensive today, but so too would her silky blonde hair, sparkling blue eyes, and smooth porcelain complexion. None the less, the picture was striking, and she was amazingly beautiful. Far far, more beautiful and elegant than the likes of Alec Wek, Naomi Campbell, or the like.

Posted by at 11:55 AM on February 3


“Black models always bring personality to the runway.”

It’s like when my friend tried to set me up with a girl. I asked if she was attractive and he said, “well, she’s got personality”. We ALL know what that means! It’s a universal code understood by men.

Notice he didn’t say they bring beauty, style, grace, glamour or anything the fashion industry is REALLY about?

Posted by Steve at 12:57 PM on February 3


“As I see it, communism was a bad idea”…
Communism is a blatantly false ideology based on the transparently false assumption that no women on earth wants TWO mink coats until every woman on earth has ONE mink coat!

Posted by Tim MC Hugh at 1:43 PM on February 3


How about National Geographic? Theres always lots of black beauties in there and nobody accuses them of racism!!!!

Posted by at 1:50 PM on February 3


Models were a homogeneous bunch — overwhelmingly white, bony and often blond.

A few years back a modeling agency came to a mall in my city searching for potential models. The news media was there to film it all. Most of the females shown standing in line were non-White, and the vast majority of them were entirely too short, and way too heavy. Most looked like women you might see every day at the grocery store, waiting at a busstop. They were plain and ordinary! But tall, slim, white models, who’s body types are far from average, but ideal for displaying designer fashions, are now dismissed as homogenous? I guess he would rather see those short, plump, ethnic types strut on the runway instead? Since when did everyday looks become a fantasy?

Posted by at 2:29 PM on February 3


The real story is the masculinization of beauty at the hands of Madison Avenue and Hollywood. Just take a look at the beauties of 40s cinema; they’re feminine, not masculinized like the beauty currently “in fashion” (code for Hollywood’s agenda); most center around average height, they had gracile features, enough subcutaneous fat to have a soft feminine shape, small hands and feet, etc.; unlike today’s tendency toward tall, mesomorphic, big-framed, big-faced boyish women. The racial quality was different too, with a tendency toward Germanic women in the past, and toward Slavic women today.

Google your own comparisons - the difference is unmistakable.

Posted by Svigor at 2:40 PM on February 3


Oh, btw, if you read around the model sites (i.e., sites geared toward serving models and photographers) you’ll find that the physical restrictions on models are correlated with whiteness (e.g., if you’re white you have to be a certain height for certain industry sectors, but if you’re not white you don’t have to be as tall), which belies the whining of these diversicrats.

Posted by Svigor at 2:45 PM on February 3


If they’re Asian, the hair is straight. If African, tightly curled.


Many black women are no longer willing to admit that the vast majority of them have tightly coiled hair. Most now insist their hair comes in all textures, including straight. Well, their weaves do anyway, but we aren’t supposed to know it’s not their own.

Posted by at 3:33 PM on February 3


Well in advance of Fashion Week, Ford’s superstar Chanel Iman Robinson, who was often the single black face in shows last season, was already reserved for most of the major shows.

In case you were wondering, here’s what this “superstar” black model Chanel Iman Robinson looks like:

https://frillr.com/files/images/chanel-iman.preview.jpg

I don’t see what’s special about her. She’s not hard on the eyes, but compare her to Cindy Crawford, Claudia Schiffer or Heidi Klum in their heydays if you think Ms. Chanel isn’t getting a free ride based on her skin color.

As for Yordanos Teshager, she just looks most 20 yr old Ethiopian women I’ve seen. My husband and I frequent an Ethiopian restaurant that has 3 waitresses that look just like her. Boring! Fashion models are supposed to be eye-catching, not average.

The real story should all the Russian and Eastern European fashion models who have taken the industry by storm. That’s diversity, isn’t it? Guess not.


“Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

I have never fantasied about looking like a black woman - EVER. I’d rather look like average me than like the black models mentioned in this article!

Posted by Jill at 8:32 PM on February 3


Unbelievable liberal guilt and self-hatred.

Posted by from New Orleans at 9:00 PM on February 3


I am not black and I never look twice at fashion worn by blacks.
I am white and I am interested in what attracts white people not blacks. I don’t want to look black or be black and what blacks think of any fashion item is of no interest to me. If they are so worried why don’t they start their own comapanies and advertising agencies, instead of their usual leach tactics.

Posted by no Corn bread please at 9:25 PM on February 3


Note how the AA crowd is also wanting to muscle into private industries here now too.

Posted by at 11:11 PM on February 3


“Alex Wek is no super model. She makes a decent living, that is all. She will have little work once she reaches 30. Her face is rather ugly. Her skin is a true black, not brown which makes it impossible to light her properly and totally unsuitable for group shots with other models. The White models would blend into the paper and Yordanos Teshager and Naomi Campbell would turn yellow.

Also that black black skin means real problems for print work. With so many couture clothes being basic black, that is a problem, it is impossible to tell where her skin ends and the clothes begins. Putting her in white, pastel or bright colors is no solution either. She just doesn’t look right. Brown skinned black models can carry off most colors, but Alex Wek can’t carry off any color.”

Excellent points! Here is the perfect example featuring Alek Wek next to Cindy Crawford at an event:

https://abcnews.go.com/WN/popup?id=3563508

So, fellas - who would you rather date??

In fact, I propose an experiment:
Pick the Top 100 Politically Correct white males from politics and entertainment, and hook them up to a polygraph machine. Focus a video camera on their faces, then show them that picture…then make them say which female they find more attractive. Once 100 out of 100 pick the white model (including gay guys), ask them to explain why! It would be hilarious.

Posted by Jill at 12:33 AM on February 4


They are trying to bludgeon the high end businesses to take in their AA black models. But this is a business, not social service, so I hope they won’t be brow beaten by these goons. Most couture and expensive items are bought by whites and east asians. Ever been to Gucci, Louis Vouitton, and Chanel? Whites and E. Asians.

In fact, a few years ago, Louis Vouitton co. publically thanked the Japanese for keeping the company in business. Now, what faces would these people like to see model their expensive items. ‘Upper class’ wealthy looking white or E. Asian models or third world looking black models?

Wealthy people don’t really want to see their stuff being flung around by low iq, low economic, and therefore not attractive blacks even if they look more white than black. They are still mulattos, not a legitimate part of the wealthy and powerful of the world.

Posted by at 3:56 AM on February 4


“Young says that when a client asks for “the girl next door,” he responds that “the girl next door to me was Filipino… . Can I send a black girl?” Although he says he’s fully aware that the client wants a white model, he notes that in the end, “It’s my job to sell beauty not ethnicity.”


In the Upper Midwest, (where I was born) the ‘girl next door’ is still a Celto-Scandic-Germanic blond or brunette Caucasoid beauty. The increasing Asians and Hispanics we are getting clearly bespeak ‘Other’, no matter how much diversityspeak we hear…..

Moreover, Svigor has it right. The ‘fashion industry’ complains about ‘beauty,’ but how can a designer whose sexual tastes run to his own sex for mating partners, even BEGIN to understand the beauty of the female form fron the standpoint of a heterosexual male?

When women are draped and TREATED as ‘women,’ rather than as anorexic cogs in a multicultural diversity machine, perhaps THEN we might get ‘models of color.’

On top of that, the Grecian ideal of beauty is still that- an IDEAL of what ‘beauty’ is. We may get songs from the Afro-American community about “I like big butts,” but the truth of the matter is, we want to see the divine in a feminine form, not the merely overweight. IF we men didn’t, women wouldn’t be paying for every exercise regimen in the world, for her rotundness would be sufficient for their respective spouses, who would never look at Marilyn, Grace, Brigitte, Kim, or even Angelina again…..

Oh, and by the way, Sarah Jessica Parker is UGLY!

Posted by AlmostMusicPhD at 7:51 AM on February 4


“Isn’t it ironic that “diversity” has become a code word for “black”?”

The bottom line is that, ‘diversity’ is celebrating racism against whites. Well, maybe it is a code word for black.

Posted by at 11:15 AM on February 4


Has anyone ever heard of the Ebony magazine fashion show? It happens every year. It goes on tour to all the cities of America. I have never been to one, but I have seen pictures.

The clothes are splendid and colorful and expensive. The models naturally are all black.

Blacks want to keep their all black venues and use affirmative action to put White models out of work.

Posted by margaret at 11:57 AM on February 4


Posted above:

“This is in contrast to what we see on TV advertising daily. My new favorite for the ad with the magic black guy is the new Plavix ad. It shows this tall, super competent black guy directing a bunch of poor white workers during a power outage. After showing him in a variety of commanding positions, it shows him standing in darkness and then the lights to the city coming on. The ultimate magic black guy. Get this advertising agency to handle the model hiring, and the beautiful models will be all black, with only a few short, fat white women with bad complexions as competition.”

Yes, that one really does take the cake. I’m surprised they didn’t put him in a cape.

Interesting observation about Target: The models used on their in-store posters are now almost ALL non-white (and they don’t even try to find ‘attractive’ minorities). But the products for sale on the shelves have very few minorities - except for toys where the multicult propaganda is very heavy. Diaper packaging is also trying to erase whites but there is always at least one white baby in every size among the competing brands so you can always buy a package with a white baby. You just need to switch brands as your baby grows, which is what I do.

By the way, most Target employees and customers are white. I guess if you need blacks in your stores they might as well be in photograph. Pictures can’t shoplift, after all.

Posted by Civilized Neighbor at 1:00 PM on February 4


“Some shows had just one black model,” Barker [Nigel Barker, the photographer and judge on TV’s “America’s Next Top Model”] says, adding that he found the shows monotonous, visually unexciting and depressing. “Fashion is about fantasy, and everybody’s fantasy is not to be 6 feet and white.”

Uh, wrong answer, Nigel. Pretty much every human being’s fantasy - male or female - clocks in at 6 feet tall and blonde. Thousands of years of the human experience have proven this.

Posted by Legal Eagle at 2:19 PM on February 4


William Hendershot:
“This is in contrast to what we see on TV advertising daily. My new favorite for the ad with the magic black guy is the new Plavix ad. It shows this tall, super competent black guy directing a bunch of poor white workers during a power outage. After showing him in a variety of commanding positions, it shows him standing in darkness and then the lights to the city coming on. The ultimate magic black guy. “

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

ConanTheContrarian

In theory, a diverse cast will more accurately reflect “reality”.
The enhanced realism of the image makes it appear a more genuine and, therefore, the accompanying message more believable and persuasive.

In reality, these highly orchestrated images always feel stilted, contrived and above all, completely artificial. They rarely project an image that most people - white or black- would find familiar or even recognize.

Rather than “celebrating diversity”, every minority seems to be cast into the same role – basically, a typical “boring”, educated, professional, upper-middle class, white American.


The mannerisms, voice inflection, clothing, family structure, leisure activities… everything about the character (with the exception of their skin color, of course) betrays a deliberate and stringent adherence to the WASP ideal.

Ironic, isn’t it?

It’s the multy culties who seem the most determined to promote white culture as the only acceptable culture… while at the same time ruthlessly undermining the society that created it.

Posted by ConanTheContrarian at 2:48 PM on February 4


Funny post, Memphomaniac - reminds me of the silly practice of the Dallas Morning News. Each week they publish pictures and info. on current lawbreakers. To be PC, they always list 2 whites, 2 blacks and 2 Hispanics. I started watching this some time ago and it’s always the same. I think we know if the truth be told, who would be featured the most. This is also the newspaper that is running a big ad for Latino models, speaking of such. I see the runways of America changing - the models will be 5’1” and 160 lbs. That ought to sell lots of slinky dresses!

Posted by June at 3:35 PM on February 4


“Modeling agencies choose what the clients want and what sells. Bottom line. It’s not about racism, it’s about supply and demand.”
- - - - - - -

You are sadly mistaken, and what you are saying is uninformed nonsense!

There was an article in the NY Times magazine a few years ago about how the advertising industry, under heavy pressure, got together and held a meeting and agreed to promote Diversity in every way they can. We now see the results of it in every TV or magazine ad.

There have even been more recent articles here on Amren about how the NY City department of something-or-other brought legal action (or the threat of it) to FORCE advertisers to use more “diverse” models. It has come to the point where agencies are NOT free to choose what they want or what sells. Under Political Correctness, the “free market” no longer operates freely. Ideology comes first.

Posted by browser at 2:03 AM on February 5


“To me, the blacks forcing themselves onto whites is akin to forcing someone to date you or marry you who has no interest in you. “
Posted by at 11:50 AM

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I think you’re being naive and you’re missing an essential point here. It isn’t necessarily BLACKS who are forcing themselves on whites in the name of “diversity”. It’s more likely to be ideologues committed to a certain social agenda. After all, people like Mr. Kaplan of Ford Models, Nigel Barker, and Prof. Mincarelli of Fashion Institute don’t sound like blacks to me.

Posted by browser at 2:26 AM on February 5



“Get rid of the brainwashing please - all of it! Most African Americans have very little white, if any. “

To the contrary, yes they do. If you visited Africa and saw real Africans, you would see the difference at once.

Posted by at 2:33 AM on February 5


The real story is the masculinization of beauty at the hands of Madison Avenue and Hollywood. Just take a look at the beauties of 40s cinema; they’re feminine, not masculinized like the beauty currently “in fashion” …

The thing of it is, there is a difference between cinema and fashion and as one era changes into another, so does preferences in style. The 40’s were a cinematic period of high drama and classic beauty. Some of this extended into the general advertising. In the decades to follow, there was a progressive move away from dramatic style and more of the kind of look that lends towards familiar and casual.

High fashion and runway modeling is a world unto itself. It’s not really the clothes that designers are trying to sell. They want to sell their designs. Their use of the models is to accentuate the presentation. Those same clothes and designs are mostly purchased by professional buyers and are then redesigned to fit the actual lifestyle and body type for their particular target group.

One of the things I like about Cindy Crawford is that she has publicly conceded that even she does not look like Cindy Crawford. Lovely as she is, most of modeling is really a package that is the polished result of carefully layered make-up, hair gels, creams, sprays, and yes, extensions for added fullness and length, even for white models. There is also body tape used to push up some body parts while flattening others.

Ultimately, fashion models do not have to be beautiful and often, they are not. Usually pretty or just average. This is because one paradox of the beauty industry is that the features that most lend towards true beauty don’t always photograph as well. Given the right size and shape, less pronounced cheekbones and eyelids can be more easily enhanced for the camera; a gaunt jaw line tends not to be as attractive in person than under the right lighting or in a photograph. The other paradox is that too beautiful a face will overshadow the intended product.

The features that agencies most look for are height, the shape of the face, even features, and long necks. Stylists, lighting technicians, liposuction, and implants take care of the rest. A healthy complexion is far less critical than the kind of skin tone that attracts and bounces off light at the time. This is much easier to find in adolescents and screens out a lot of would be models.

Irrespective to the Germanic (or rather, what we think of as Germanic) or the Slavic (Russia is a much wealthier country today than Germany or the United States) and irrespective to African and Hispanic skin tones, the same features are pursed. The exceptions are for purposes of novelty. To the extent that supermodels are the exception is that something in their look or personality exudes a uniqueness that stirs public interest.

Posted by at 12:01 PM on February 5


“Rather than “celebrating diversity”, every minority seems to be cast into the same role – basically, a typical…upper-middle class, white American. The mannerisms, voice inflection, clothing, family structure, leisure activities… everything … betrays a deliberate and stringent adherence to the WASP ideal. -ronic, isn’t it? It’s the multy culties who seem the most determined to promote white culture as the only acceptable culture”
Conan


.,.,.,.,.,.,.,..,.,.,.,.,.,..,.,.,.,.,.

Interesting observation! So true. I suppose they just haven’t gotten around to applying the full attack on whites yet. Little by little, they’re sneaking up on us. It’s coming. Eventually, they will have to drop all pretense of imitating whites or of any respect for white culture. In thirty years, will dysfunctional families, wild children, pimps, drugs, living on credit, evading the bill collectors, and ghetto culture be considered normal and “in”? While those old-fashioned Waspy values as holding a job, staying sober, raising your kids, and paying your bills will be sneered at as so “out”!

Posted by ghw at 3:36 PM on February 5


“One of the things I like about Cindy Crawford is that she has publicly conceded that even she does not look like Cindy Crawford. Lovely as she is, most of modeling is really a package that is the polished result of [artistry].”
……………………..

That reminds me of something once said by Rita Hayworth — that “there’s no such person as Rita Hayworth”. Ditto with Greta Gardo. And Marilyn Monroe. And Marlene Dietrich. All creations of the camera, and the make-up artist, and the publicity department. etc. etc.

I recall an advertising campaign for Blackglama mink coats, featuring a number of Hollywood legends, mostly well past their prime. It was done by a very famous photographer whose name I don’t recall for sure [Avedon?]. Anyway, Ido recall him making the remark that when he got Lana Turner to photograph, there was one very big problem: she didn’t LOOK like Lana Turner! He said — “But when I got done with her … SHE LOOKED LIKE LANA TURNER!!!”

Posted by ghw at 9:06 PM on February 5


The thing of it is, there is a difference between cinema and fashion and as one era changes into another, so does preferences in style. The 40’s were a cinematic period of high drama and classic beauty. Some of this extended into the general advertising. In the decades to follow, there was a progressive move away from dramatic style and more of the kind of look that lends towards familiar and casual.

Lol, nonsense. The looks have trended away from feminine normality, and toward masculine, “exotic” beauties. How is the media’s trend toward abnormal female appearance “familiar and casual”? If anything, a demand for the “familiar and casual” should lead more in the direction of 40s and 50s Hollywood, more toward the girl next door. High drama is perhaps more in line with the exotic, the outlier.

High fashion and runway modeling is a world unto itself. It’s not really the clothes that designers are trying to sell. They want to sell their designs. Their use of the models is to accentuate the presentation. Those same clothes and designs are mostly purchased by professional buyers and are then redesigned to fit the actual lifestyle and body type for their particular target group.

They’re disproportionately homosexual, and it shows in their preferences in models (women who look like boys).

Ultimately, fashion models do not have to be beautiful and often, they are not. Usually pretty or just average.

Average (or rather, the mean) is beautiful (e.g., photo morphing). (Women of below average height are more reproductively successful (or desired by typical men, I forget which))

This is because one paradox of the beauty industry is that the features that most lend towards true beauty don’t always photograph as well. Given the right size and shape, less pronounced cheekbones and eyelids can be more easily enhanced for the camera; a gaunt jaw line tends not to be as attractive in person than under the right lighting or in a photograph. The other paradox is that too beautiful a face will overshadow the intended product.

I could buy this if I agreed with your pronouncements on the aesthetics of portraiture/photography, but I don’t. These women don’t look better photographed; it’s not as if I’m digging for candid shots and going “aha!”; I don’t like the products they’re used to make as much as I do the products of the women conforming to the healthier ideals of the past.

To the extent that supermodels are the exception is that something in their look or personality exudes a uniqueness that stirs public interest.

I love the “audience” argument, as if the audience is the ultimate driver of media aesthetics in casting and such. No, economics is not all demand! Supply is half, and it can drive demand, if not as often as the other way around; nobody specializes in creating demand from thin air like Hollywood and Madison Avenue. Yes, customers will “settle” for the best of what’s on offer, but that doesn’t mean supply is meeting demand, or that the demand is self-authored.

Posted by Svigor at 5:44 PM on February 8



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